**UPDATE** I discussed this issue with Customer Service who, by the way, have the best Rep's in the world. Their engineers reviewed my data and concluded the sounds being recorded were coming from a TV in the room. At first it was hard to agree with them but after I listened over and over to a few of the recordings it was apparent it was from the TV. My Bad!! I'm back to being an Echo fan. ūüėä
Amazon's Alexa-powered speakers are great for a lot of things beyond playing music or changing the color of your smart bulbs. Alexa can play audiobooks or read your Kindle books to you, if you don't have the audiobook version. It can give you the forecast, the latest tech news (with CNET!) or tell you if you should expect traffic on your way to work. And it can, of course, tell you a few jokes.

From there, you can ask Alexa all sorts of questions: You can ask her to play music, ask about the weather, or ask her to convert measurements for you. You can also use her to shop for products on Amazon¬†or to control other smart home devices in your home. A number of third-party apps and services work with Alexa, so you can do things like order a Domino‚Äôs pizza, or ask for the latest Washington Post headlines. Amazon calls each of these different capabilities¬†‚Äúskills.‚ÄĚ One of her newest skills is the ability to work as an intercom system in your home.


If you have a handful of Alexa-capable smart home products, you can now set up commands known as routines. Routines let Alexa perform multiple actions with a single voice command. For example, you could say ‚ÄúAlexa, start my day‚ÄĚ for her to start playing your daily Flash Briefing, give you an update on the weather, and turn on the lights in the living room. 

The flash briefing skill submission process provides the steps to submit descriptive information about your skill and configure one or more feeds for each skill. You can then test your skill in your Alexa-enabled device and provide additional information about how you handle customer data and privacy. Once you've provided this information, you can submit your flash briefing skill for certification and use by customers.

There are concerns about the access Amazon has to private conversations in the home and other non-verbal indications that can identify who is present in the home with non-stop audio pick-up from Alexa-enabled devices.[69][70] Amazon responds to these concerns by stating that the devices only stream recordings from the user's home when the 'wake word' activates the device.
In September 2016, a university student competition called the Alexa Prize was announced for November of that year.[174] The prize is equipped with a total of $2.5 million and teams and their universities can win cash and research grants. The process started with team selection in 2016.[175] The 2017 inaugural competition focuses on the challenge of building a socialbot. The University of Washington student team was awarded first place for the 2017 prize.[176] A second year of the competition has been announced.
The flash briefing skill submission process provides the steps to submit descriptive information about your skill and configure one or more feeds for each skill. You can then test your skill in your Alexa-enabled device and provide additional information about how you handle customer data and privacy. Once you've provided this information, you can submit your flash briefing skill for certification and use by customers.
×